#7 The Future of Computing Devices

Electrical Engineering Professor Naveen Verma Ph.D. received the B.A.Sc. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada in 2003 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005 and 2009 respectively. Since July 2009 he has been with the department of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research focuses on ultra-low-power integrated circuits and systems with an emphasis on sensing applications.

January 31, 2019 - 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Naveen Verma, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering & Daniel Steinberg, Ph.D., Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials

We will explore where we are in computing today and discuss with Princeton University engineers, some of the surprising and fascinating options for where we might go with revolutionary shifts in computing technology.  The kinds of computing we require and the places that require computing are changing.   The underlying physics used to achieve the broad computing functions that are important to us is hitting fundamental limits.  It is time to think of new ways of building new types of computers, with new devices, circuits, and architectures to meet the needs of the future.

Electronics are poised to have a redefined relationship with people and society. As we realize the potential of electronics in computing, we will see computing devices move from the confinements of cyber systems, to systems that pervade all aspects of our lives where their impacts can be far greater in value, scale, and breadth. This future requires materials science for the development of devices which harness natural forces in new innovative ways.

We will discuss how our engineers and materials scientists are building new microarchitectures and architectures, to scale up and appropriately control the computations possible.  We will also discuss the relevance of modern computing to K-12 students for their education, their development of 21st century skills, and as an informed citizenship.